Mayo Clinic's approach

Living-donor transplant consultation at Mayo Clinic Living-donor transplant consultation at Mayo Clinic

Note: Items within this content were created prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and do not demonstrate proper pandemic protocols. Please follow all recommended Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for masking and social distancing.

Start Your Donor Evaluation

Begin the process of becoming a living kidney or liver donor by clicking here to complete a health history questionnaire.

Living-Donor Toolkit

Learn what transplant recipients and living donors can expect: tests, screening, the procedures, risks, recovery, financial information and more.

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest transplant practices in the United States. Our transplant doctors, surgeons and other transplant staff members at the Mayo Clinic campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota have extensive experience with living-donor kidney and liver transplantation.

The living-donor process at Mayo Clinic starts with completing a health history questionnaire.

Health care professionals trained in many medical specialties work together as a team to ensure favorable outcomes for living donors. Care team roles

Health care professionals trained in many medical specialties work together as a team to ensure favorable outcomes for living donors.

  • Team approach. Mayo Clinic's integrated teams of surgeons, doctors, transplant nurses, pharmacists and others work together to provide your care, from your evaluation through post-surgery care.

    The transplant team will evaluate you to determine if you can donate a kidney or part of your liver. You'll have blood tests as well as a thorough physical examination and psychological evaluation. Several other tests, including detailed imaging of your liver or kidneys, will be performed to ensure that you're in good health and you meet donation criteria.

    After you donate an organ, living-donor coordinators and other transplant staff members will offer you support and follow-up care for several months after your surgery.

  • Coordinated care. Having all of this subspecialized expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not just getting one opinion — your care is discussed among the team, your test results are available quickly, appointments are scheduled in coordination, and your transplant care team works together to determine what may be most appropriate for you.
  • Surgical expertise. Mayo Clinic surgeons perform living-donor transplant surgery for liver transplant and kidney transplant. Surgeons perform minimally invasive surgery to remove a living donor's kidney (laparoscopic donor nephrectomy) for a kidney transplant, which is less painful and has a shorter recovery time for the donor compared with open surgery.
  • Research. Mayo Clinic researchers actively study the health of donors after transplant surgery to improve results. At Mayo Clinic, you may have access to ongoing clinical trials, research and new treatments as part of your living-donor transplantation experience.

The Mayo Clinic experience and patient stories

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of satisfied Mayo Clinic patients.

Expertise and rankings

Living-donor transplant team at Mayo Clinic Living-donor transplant team at Mayo Clinic

Experience

Mayo Clinic surgeons have extensive experience performing living-donor transplant surgery for liver transplant and kidney transplant.

Transplant leader

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest living-donor kidney and liver transplant programs in the United States.

Across its three sites, Mayo Clinic surgeons have performed more than 14,500 kidney transplants. They currently perform 950 kidney transplants each year, including many from living kidney donors.

Mayo Clinic surgeons perform nearly 450 liver transplants each year among its three campuses, including many from living liver donors.

Advanced treatment and technology

Mayo Clinic surgeons have extensive expertise with all types of living-donor transplant surgeries, including minimally invasive procedures, HIV-positive organ donation, paired-organ donation and other complex procedures.

Innovation and research

Mayo Clinic transplant researchers take a leading role in efforts to find new, improved ways to conduct all aspects of transplantation, improve the experience of donation, reduce risks and improve the outcomes of transplantation.

The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies for living-donor transplant research.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for diabetes and endocrinology in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for diabetes and endocrinology by U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for digestive disorders in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for digestive disorders by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic Children's Center in Rochester is ranked the No. 1 hospital in Minnesota, and the five-state region of Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin, according to U.S. News & World Report's 2021-2022 "Best Children's Hospitals" rankings.

Locations, travel and lodging

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Costs and insurance

Living-donor frequently asked costs and insurance questions

Learn more

Mayo Clinic has dedicated transplant financial services representatives and social workers who can assist you with insurance and financial questions regarding your living organ donation.

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. Many insurance companies require you to get preapproval authorization prior to transplant services.

For international patients

Mayo Clinic has dedicated international patient account representatives who can assist you with questions regarding your costs and insurance. Read more about international financial services.

Case managers

Mayo Clinic financial staff will work closely with your case managers from your insurance company. Your case manager, who is assigned to you, is available to answer questions and calls related to your insurance costs.

More information about billing and insurance:

Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota

Mayo Clinic Health System

Clinical trials

Explore Mayo Clinic studies of tests and procedures to help prevent, detect, treat or manage conditions.

May 03, 2022
  1. Living donation. United Network for Organ Sharing. https://www.unos.org/donation/living-donation/. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  2. Cotler SJ, et al. Living donor liver transplantation. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  3. Donate organs while alive. Health Resources and Services Administration. https://www.organdonor.gov/about/process/living-donation.html. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  4. Finding a living donor. UNOS Transplant Living. https://transplantliving.org/kidney/who-are-living-donors/. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  5. Risks. UNOS Transplant Living. https://transplantliving.org/living-donation/being-a-living-donor/risks/. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  6. Lentine KL, et al. Kidney transplantation in adults: Evaluation of the living kidney donor candidate. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  7. Liver. UNOS Transplant Living. http://www.transplantliving.org/living-donation/about-the-operation/liver/. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  8. Types of living donation. UNOS Transplant Living. https://transplantliving.org/living-donation/types/. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  9. Vella J. Kidney transplantation in adults: Living unrelated donors. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  10. Abu-Gazala S, et al. Current status of living donor liver transplantation in the United States. Annual Review of Medicine. 2019; doi:10.1146/annurev-med-051517-125454.
  11. About the operation. UNOS Transplant Living. https://transplantliving.org/living-donation/about-the-operation/. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  12. Sonnenberg EM, et al. Pregnancy outcomes after living liver donation: A multi-institutional study. Liver Transplantation. 2021; doi:10.1002/lt.26098.
  13. Eligibility guidelines. National Living Donor Assistance Center. https://www.livingdonorassistance.org/How-to-Apply/Eligibility-Guidelines. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  14. Lentine KL, et al. Kidney transplantation in adults: Risks of living kidney donation. https://www.uptodate.com/home/contents/search. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  15. What to expect after donation. National Kidney Foundation. https://www.kidney.org/transplantation/livingdonors/what-expect-after-donation. Accessed Oct. 1, 2021.
  16. Lentine KL, et al. Risks of living kidney donation: Current state of knowledge on outcomes important to donors. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 2019; doi:10.2215/CJN.11220918.
  17. McKinney WT, et al. Development of a patient-specific search of transplant program outcomes and characteristics: Feedback from kidney transplant patients. Transplantation Direct. 2020; doi:10.1097/TXD.0000000000001036.

Related

Products & Services